Curriculum Vitae

Education

Ph.D. Candidate, Economics, University of Texas at Austin, May 2020 (Expected)

M.S., Economics, University of Texas at Austin, 2017

B.A., Economics, Mathematics, Brigham Young University, Cum Laude, 2015

References

Sandra Black (co-chair), Department of Economics, Columbia University, sblack@columbia.edu

Richard Murphy (co-chair), Department of Economics, University of Texas at Austin, richard.murphy@austin.utexas.edu

Jason Abrevaya, Department of Economics, University of Texas at Austin, abrevaya@austin.utexas.edu

Stephen Trejo, Department of Economics, University of Texas at Austin, trejo@austin.utexas.edu

Teaching and Research Fields

Fields: Labor Economics, Economics of Education, Public Finance, Applied Microeconomics

Sub-Fields: Education, Gender, Family

Honors, Scholarships, and Fellowships

University of Texas Summer Research Fellowship, 2019

University of Texas Graduate School Fellowship, 2015-2016

Research Experience and Other Employment

Research Assistant, “College Selectivity and Educational Outcomes: Evidence from the Texas Ten Percent Plan,” Sandra Black (Columbia University), Jesse Rothstein (UC Berkeley), Jeff Denning (Brigham Young University), 2016-2019

Research Assistant, “Using Incentives to Encourage Healthy Eating in Children”, “Lunch Recess and Nutrition: Responding to Time Incentives in the Cafeteria”, Joseph Price (Brigham Young University), 2013-2015

Teaching Experience

Labor Economics, University of Texas at Austin, Teaching Assistant for Professor Stephen Trejo, 2019

Labor Economics, University of Texas at Austin, Teaching Assistant for Professor Sandra Black, 2018

Economics of Education, University of Texas at Austin, Teaching Assistant for Professor Richard Murphy, 2018

Labor Economics, University of Texas at Austin, Teaching Assistant for Professor Stephen Trejo, 2017

History of Economics, University of Texas at Austin, Teaching Assistant for Professor Patrick van Horn, 2016

Introduction to Microeconomics, University of Texas at Austin, Teaching Assistant for Professor Michael Hickenbottom, 2015

Econometrics, Brigham Young University, Teaching Assistant for Professor Richard Butler, 2014

Introduction to Game Theory, Brigham Young University, Teaching Assistant for Professor Val Lambson, 2014

Working Papers

“Is Paid Family Leave a Pro-Natal Policy? Evidence from California” (Job Market Paper)

This paper provides the first evidence of the effects of paid family leave on fertility in the United States. I exploit variation in access to paid leave introduced by the first paid family leave mandate in the country, which was implemented in California in 2004. By guaranteeing six weeks of paid leave to new parents, this policy, while not necessarily intended as pro-natal, might encourage increased childbearing. I use data containing the universe of U.S. births from Vital Statistics alongside survey data from the March Current Population Survey. I compare probability of childbirth and state fertility rates before and after policy implementation and between California and other states. Because the policy was introduced in only one state at one time, I employ several methods of inference, including randomization tests with synthetic control methods, to infer causality. Additionally, I exploit variation in county female labor force participation in an intensity-of-treatment framework. I find that as a result of the policy, probability of childbirth increases significantly, and that this is driven by increases in rates of second and higher parity childbearing. Fertility effects are concentrated amongst women in their 30s, with pronounced effects for married women and women with below median family income. Moreover, women likely to have been eligible for leave at the time of their first childbirth are more likely to have a second child.

“Does College Access Increase High School Effort? Evaluating the impact of the Texas Top 10% Rule on Disadvantaged Students” (Revise and Resubmit at Journal of Public Economics)

I study how the Texas Top 10% rule, which guaranteed state college admission to all Texas high school students in the top decile of their graduating classes, affected student effort and achievement in high school. The new admissions regime not only increased access to Texas flagships for top students at disadvantaged schools, but potentially made college seem more attainable for all students at these schools by providing increased information about the college admissions process and increasing the incidence of college-going among peers. Using administrative data from Texas and a difference-in-differences framework, I show that the admissions regime change significantly impacted high school student effort. As a result of the policy, students at disadvantaged high schools increase their attendance and are more likely to graduate. These students also perform better on high school exit exams, fail fewer courses in high school, and become more likely to enroll in a state higher education institution. Notably, positive effects are not concentrated only among students likely to qualify for automatic admission but throughout most of the achievement distribution.

Work in Progress

The Impacts of Access to Public Paid Family Leave on Marriage and Childbirth

Are Kids too Expensive? Evaluating the Effects of Childcare Costs on Fertility